º Jewel Garland of Chöd Feasts Pūjā · Tsokle Rinchen Trengwa Pūjā º

The Tibetan word Chöd means “to cut” or “to slay” and the Chöd practice is known as “cutting through the ego.”

The purpose of the practice is to cut through the ignorance of clinging to the existence of an inherent self or “I” which is recognized as the root of all suffering. This is done using the wisdom that realizes emptiness found in the Prajñāpāramitā or “Perfection of Wisdom” sutra.

Through the practice, one develops relative Bodhicitta (where others are considered more precious than oneself) and ultimate Bodhicitta (where the emptiness of all phenomena is understood).

Besides its profound meaning, the practice is also famous for its many wonderful melodies. 

Each year on Dakini Day of the sacred fourth month in the Tibetan calendar, Saga Dawa, the Tsokle Rinchen Trengwa Pūjā is practiced at Ka-Nying Shedrub Ling monastery by the monks and nuns and many lay practitioners. 

This Chöd tradition is said to stem from the Tibetan yoginī Machik Labdrön (1055 – 1149). The core of the Tsokle Rinchen Trengwa Pūjā (Jewel Garland of Chöd Feasts) was composed by the Third Karmapa Rangjung Dorjé (1284–1339), and edited by Karma Chakmé Rinpoche (1613-1678). It is one of the main long Chöd rituals practiced in many Nyingma and Kagyü monasteries.

May the virtue of anyone who rejoices in this auspicious activity be dedicated to the Enlightenment of all sentient beings.

 Make an offering

If you are unable to make an offering but would like to be included in the Tsokle Rinchen Trengwa Pūjā (Jewel Garland of Chöd Feasts), please send your name(s) to office@monlam.org.